Roy’s Library Weblog

My thoughts on digital collections and other items.

Photography and Preservation Seminar

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I wish that I had more to say but was kind of let down …. 😦

Well this past week I spent some time at a seminar where various aspects of photography and preservation were discussed. I went into the seminar with high hopes and great expectations. While I learned a great deal about the history of photography, I did not learn a great deal about what I wanted to know about and that is how to preserve and treat digital photographs. It seemed as if the guest speaker was more interested in giving us a history lesson than actually giving the group information on what we wanted to know about. It was quite frustrating. Because I have an interest in digital libraries and have done some reading on them, there was very little that was shared that I had not ran across in my reading. I did find some of the things concerning the preservation of photographs in the regular form to be interesting as he explained how photographs were constructed and what caused them to breakdown and what could be done to slow this down. Overall though, the seminar had too much history and not enough practical knowledge or suggestions as to what to do when you encounter photographic issues in an archive, digital or otherwise.

Some useful websites that I was alerted to in the course of the seminar are below. If there is one I overlooked I will add it when I review my notes.

http://www.archivaladvisor.org/

http://www.archivaladvisor.org/shtml/prescalc.shtml – this is a really neat tool!!!!

http://www.imagepermanenceinstitute.org/index.shtml

http://www.dp3project.org/

http://www.digitalsamplebook.org/home.htm

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Written by robbinsville

November 16, 2008 at 10:47 pm

Posted in Archives, digital collections

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Air Force Aims to ‘Rewrite Laws of Cyberspace’

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Air Force Aims to ‘Rewrite Laws of Cyberspace’

In my searching for information for my term paper, I ran across this very interesting article where it appears Big Brother is a bit irritated and may be about to encroach upon individual privacy rights. I understand that the Air Force must be able to keep its’ network safe against cyber attacks in order to better defend the nation, but I am not sure I like the direction they are heading. I don’t like the fact that it seems that the aim of their plan, at least initially is to gain access to all computers on a network. I am not worried about the government seeing what is on my computer as I have nothing to hide, but what they may do with this information is what bothers me. Even worse, what happens if it is hacked and taken by someone not so trustworthy. I know that being on the Net takes away some of my anonymity but I don’t need the government using the security excuse to get into my computer and what not.

One thing I was fascinated about when it came to digital collections and the article was the fact that the Air Force is aiming to try to change the rules of the internet to make things more secure. This could help those presiding over digital collections by enhancing security and preventing individuals from doing things to hurt the integrity of the collection. I am curious to see where the Air Force efforts go and what it is going to do to internet security as well as to the privacy of everyone.

Written by robbinsville

November 10, 2008 at 5:39 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Google turns on OCR for scanned PDFs

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Google turns on OCR for scanned PDFs

Well Google continues to find ways to make searching the Net for information more efficient and easy. In surfing the web I came across this article concerning PDF’s and how they are indexed by Google. Google is starting to use optical character recognition on PDF’s that are indexed there which is going to expand the number of sources one is able to find by utilizing the search engine. I am curious as to how accurate this technology is and what efforts are being made to make it more accurate. If it were accurate it could make indexing digital collections of manuscripts much easier and effective. This could save money and also allow archivists and others increase the number of documents they could be online in short order.

Written by robbinsville

November 2, 2008 at 8:07 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Super-Targeted Ads Coming to a Browser Near You

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Google seems to be at it again as they have come up with another innovation that will allow them to better target users with ads. This is understandable considering that the well being of the company is based on how much money it can generate through the sale of ads. I found it amazing that through information given off by your browser while on the Web the company can now target users with ads based on geographical location. The article even states that eventually the software that enables this kind of tracking will get down to the street and neighborhood level. I found this to be really interesting, but at the same time a bit disturbing because it kind of shoots down any illusion of privacy people feel they have while online.

I can see the usefulness for advertisers, but also had a crazy idea that it could also be useful for archives when it comes to trying to highlight collections. If a digital collection had this technology available, it could build a site where collections of interest to a particular area could be highlighted for that use as they access the site. It would give the site a feeling of being personalized and many may find it to be something very attractive about the site. At the same time, it may also creep people out as it may give off the feeling that big brother is watching and that things may not be as anonymous on the Net as they may think.

Just my thoughts on the subject and just curious as to what others may think about this……… 🙂

Written by robbinsville

October 24, 2008 at 3:40 pm

Web 2.0 and Archives

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Well I have just finished by proposal for my digital collection and was thinking about what could be done to ensure that the collection will meet the needs of information users who do not want to turn to library or archival staff for help.  I think that the use of some web 2.0 tools, like wikis, could be a great help.  Using these would allow people to leave messages about effective search strategies and other thoughts users of the archive may find useful.  While these postings would have to be monitored for content by some staff member, it would not be that time consuming in comparison to the benefit it could yield for users.  It could also be away for people to network and gain access to information that is not part of the archival collection.  I found the following site that has tons of different Web 2.0 tools – GoWeb20.net

I was curious as to what others thought about placing Web 2.0 tools within a digital collection to help those who use it.

Written by robbinsville

October 19, 2008 at 11:06 pm

Global Digital Storage Capacity

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Study: amount of digital info > global storage capacity

In my digital collections class we read a great deal about how important it is make things available digitally and the issues in doing so. One thing that I have not read a great deal about is how the international community is going to deal with storing this explosion in digital artifacts as libraries and archives around the world start and complete various digital projects. According to this article I ran across the global storage of digital objects is over 281 exabytes or 45 GB per person. I found this to be an astonishing number, but at the same time not all that surprising as I thought about all that many in developed countries use that have a digital component to them. The article, in fact, attributed the growth to the increased popularity of digital televisions and cameras.

The unsettling part of the article is that a study by 2011 the total volume of digital content will outstrip the storage capacity available. In discussing what can be done to deal with this, the article goes on to point out that our Net behavior generates surpasses what individuals produce through digital projects. What I found disturbing about this part of the discussion was that the author stated that it was going to be up to IT to address some of these information management issues, and that privacy issues would have to be addressed. This insinuation to me seemed to infer that IT personnel would have to start to look through some of this unintended digital information and that it could reveal things that individuals did not want known, and could be a real issue.

When I started reading the article I thought there would be some discussion of what is being done or needs to be done to address this issue. In a way it did in that there was a discussion of getting rid of e-waste and the stuff I mentioned earlier, but no real discussion of what network and storage adjustments were being taken to ensure that digital storage capacity is going to increase at a rate to ensure no digital information is lost. The steps taken could have a great effect on digital projects taken by libraries and archives in the future as the demand for remote access increases. Without digital storage capacity being increased some of these digital projects may not be completed on the scale many may hope. 2011 is not that far away and I was really surprised I had not read about this issue more.

By the way if you access the article and scroll to the bottom, there is a program that you can download that will give you an estimate of your digital footprint. In other words, how much you are adding to the problem. 😉

Written by robbinsville

October 12, 2008 at 12:35 pm

DRM and Archives

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Library of Congress: DRM a serious obstacle to archiving

DRM or digital rights management is something that has come along to protect the rights of those that produce various works that appear in a digital format. Any of us that use ITunes understand the issues of DRM and the difficulties it causes in trying to keep your library archived in case your computer hard drive should crash. Until running across this article, I had never really thought of the issue in reference to archives and libraries and their struggle to ensure that items in their collection are preserved so that future generations can access them. The article discusses copyright law and a report issued by the Library of Congress.

According to the article libraries have a three copy limit for published works, which means that libraries are permitted to copy a published a work three times but only to replace those publications that are damaged. This is very strange to me because, as the author points out, this means libraries can only take action once a publication is damaged instead of being able to take early steps to ensure the library will always have a good copy of the work. What the copyright laws also do not address very well are those that are in other mediums aside from print. According to the laws today libraries and archives cannot legally make copies of an item unless that medium is obsolete. Like in reference to LP’s, most of us do not have record players but under these laws a library could not copy a LP record because there are still LP’s available on the market. The laws do not take into account that this is a dying technology and that if libraries/archives wait that the technology to convert these materials may no longer be around and make the information inaccessible.

I was really surprised by what I read in the article because it just showed me how far behind copyright law is as our society transitions into the digital realm. I also found it curious that things have been further complicated by the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which should have actually helped address the issues of the digital age. According to the act the Library of Congress can establish exemptions to the rules every three years, but even if it does it still does not help libraries. The reason it does not help libraries is under DMCA it is illegal to distribute anything that could be used to circumvent the DRM protections many digital materials have, which leaves libraries without the equipment to do anything even if allowed.

I think this whole thing is very disturbing because more and more material is being born in a digital format and may be lost to future generations if things are not changed. There will be large chunks of our history that is going to disappear in our libraries and archives because of not having the proper technology to access them, if information professionals are not given the right to preserve the materials in other formats soon. It may be something that the ALA and SAA may need to get involved in, so that Congress understands what is at stake and what needs to be done.

Written by robbinsville

October 12, 2008 at 12:06 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Google Chrome and Password Protected Web Sites

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Will Google Use Chrome to Index Password Protected Web?

I know if you read my entry on this weeks post on D2L, but thought I would continue my thoughts here. I promise if you have read my other entries that I do not have a thing for Google, but I am intrigued by the actions of Google to index the Web in order to improve the searching capability of their products.  At the same time thought, I also think that it may be coming at the cost of our privacy. I know that people partly give up their privacy every time we are on the Net and through the use agreement we make with Google and others when we use their programs, but when is enough is enough?

I do agree with the article that the plans of Google cannot be fully implemented until their web browser gains a greater market share. The problem with gaining market share though is that Google is actually seeing a decline in those who use Chrome because it does not offer anything more than the others, and others are bothered by the data the browser is collecting. I know that I stopped using it because I prefer Firefox instead.

If Google and other are able to gather surfing data while also ensuring the privacy of users, I think their efforts could go a long way towards making a search engine that could revolutionize how people get their information. Google has already gone a long way in changing how people expect to get their information, and this will just become more so as the ability of their products to yield information become more accurate and efficient.

Written by robbinsville

October 6, 2008 at 1:00 pm

National Standards Adopted in Sweden

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SE: ODF made national standard in Sweden

While surfing the Net today to do some further research for a project I am doing, I ran across this interesting article.   It discusses the adoption of the open document format by Sweden which has also been passed by Brazil, Croatia, Italy, South Korea, and South Africa as well.  I am curious in the coming months or years if any of the the leading countries around the globe follow the examples of the countries.  I think it just goes to show the direction the world is going when it comes to information and the global economy.  In order for the economy to be efficient the formats that various countries and companies use are going to have to be uniform.

This could be a great move for digital collections because it will make it easier to build platforms on which to place digital forms and artifacts.  This will be really beneficial because the platforms will be able to be made so that it will be easier to enable many to add to various collections and further the movement where people are not only consumers of information but also the producers.  It could be very useful in archival collections where people may be reluctant to give up their stuff to others, but may be willing to do it for an organization if given the ability to do so.

This movement towards common standards is one that is very interesting and it will be intersting to see if the US jumps on board early or is slow in adopting common standards.

Written by robbinsville

October 5, 2008 at 9:44 pm

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Interesting User Comsumer/ Consumer Creator Site

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Goodreads

After my digital collection class had a Saturday meeting, I came home and thought about what Dr. Martens said about how the web is changing so that people are not just consumers of information but also producers of information.  One favorite site/collection that I like that kind of reflects this movment is Goodreads.  I guess you could say it is part of the Web 2.0 thing that is occurring in that not only can one gain information from the site, but one can also be producers of information.

This site is one that if you are an avid reader you will love because not only can you let others know what you reading, but can also see what others are reading and make friends with others that have your same interests.  I thought it would be interesting if certain types of digital collections could incorporate the aspect of users adding to a collection, like on good reads.  I could see it working with a collection in education that housed lesson plans or something, or even local history collections.  Many people may not want to give up their stuff in order to have it placed on the site, but if given the chance to do it easily themselves the collections could benefit.  I know that steps would have to be taken concerning copyright and metadata, but I think it could be worth examining.   I actually started a local history project when I was teaching and found many were not willing to give up family heirlooms or historical artifacts to place on the site, even though they thought the site was a good idea.   I just think this is something that may need to be thought of by those creating archives or digital collections that may be strengthened by artifacts that are not readily available.

While wanting to raise this issue concerning digital collections, I also felt the website was an intersting way of building a collection, of books, and sharing them with others.  I only wish it allowed for the ability to do the same with other things people read, but they may be added in the future.

Written by robbinsville

October 5, 2008 at 3:53 am

Posted in Uncategorized

Interesting Article on Digital Archives

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Building Relationships “A Foundation for Digital Archives

This article is one that I found very interesting and is something to consider when it comes to establishing a digital archive and maintaining it for the long term.  This article discusses the experience of six digital archives and the alliance they created in order to develop a federated approach to data archive.  In order to do all this each digital library had to build relationships with one another at levels starting with development all the way to administration of the archive online. The hope of the alliance is to promote the development of common standards that could diminish the cost of digital collections and hope more institutions to create digital collections and maintain them for the long term as budgets decrease and the demands on those with digital collections increase.

I really liked that the group worked with software developers in an open access format was fascinating as I feel that open access to information is something that is eventually going to be the way of all information on the Net.   I also like the fact that this alliance, like many others, is moving towards a uniform standard of metadata which will help make search engines and platforms so much more effective in helping people access the information more effectively.

The next step the alliance wants to take is to bring in data repositories which will further enhance their efforts and will greatly effect how information is presented and stored digitally in archives across the country and around the world.

Written by robbinsville

October 3, 2008 at 6:53 pm

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Increase Capacity for the Net !!!!

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Grid of 100,000 computers heralds new internet dawn

I ran across this article in my daily scan of various news sites and thought this article was quite interesting in what it is going to do for the internet, and in turn digital libraries/archives. The article discusses that as a result of the Large Hadron Collider coming online that the information being produced is too great for the network that we now have for the internet. Because of this lack of capacity a new network of 100,000 computers has been created to increase processing capacity. The grid has the power to download video in seconds and to make other things like high definition video calls relatively cheap. The problem with the system right now is that because of the lack of investment in the infrastructure of the internet by telecoms the power of this new network is not something that most will be able to take advantage of anytime soon. It is going to require that a fibre-optic network be put in place and in order to do so the telecoms are going to have to charge higher rates which they are resistant to do as a result of customer resistance. It is going to take government incentive to get this done, which is not going to happen in the near future with the present economic issues the US and the rest of the world is presently facing.

When the infrastructure is put in place it could be a great for digital collections as their capacity to place video based artifacts on the net will be greatly enhanced. It should also lead to an increase in the ability of people to use these collections as more people will have the capacity to utilize these collections. This will be great for those in isolated areas they will be able to access information that is not available to them now, while at the same time allowing archives, libraries and museums to enhance the collections they place online. These enhancements will not only cause people to use the collections, but also will cause people to enter these institutions to access what has not yet been made available digitally. I think this development is one that along with the open access initiatives out there could affect the development of digital collections a great deal.

Written by robbinsville

October 3, 2008 at 5:37 pm

Open Archives Initiative

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Open Archives Initiative

In doing research for my project for my digital libraries course, I came across this interesting site dealing with what is called the open archives initiative. I had never heard of it before but think it is an interesting attempt to provide open access standards to institutional repositories. I did not realize that open access was something that was an issue when it came to archives. Upon reflection though I should have because many institutions develop archives in order to not only save their history, but place it online so that others can access the information and gain a greater understanding of that institution. I felt it was really a good source to use when attempting to build an archive because at least then the archive would be built in a manner that would allow it to be compatible and be able to move content and ideas between sources easily.

The one thing that I found most interesting was the standards appear to be quite comprehensive and really address metadata. Metadata seems to be key to this model as the group developing the standards seem to want to develop some sort of controlled vocabulary as well. I at least know what metadata set I am going to use, Dublin Core, as it is the one format that is required under the standards. In order to fully understand all of the standards I am going to have to do some more reading on metadata, so that I have more full understanding of all the subject entails. I feel this could be a great site for anyone to look at as they go to write a proposal for a digital archive. Please take a look and tell me what you think.

DLF evaluation of the Open Archives Initiative

Open Archives Forum – OAI-PMH Online Tutorial

Written by robbinsville

September 28, 2008 at 1:47 pm

Hulu

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HULU

One of my favorite digital collections on the web is one that I never really thought of as a digital collection/library until recently. The site I use on a regular basis is one called Hulu. It is site that was created \by NBC Universal and News Corp to help people find and view video content. On the site one can find TV shows, movies and clips of other programs all for free. I think it is a great collection that is constantly updated. In order to keep the site free, users must deal with the occasional commercial while viewing the program or clip, but they are relatively short and you can always look at another website while it is playing. I find it a small price to pay to be able to get access to my favorite. The site has been around for a little over a year and has been quite successful, as the site continues to add more content.

What makes this collection so great is that it is very user friendly and one can find programs and clips using a keyword search. Another great thing about the site is that is not only allows one to view shows from the past week, but in some cases you can go back and watch past seasons of a show. That has been great for me because when I need a break from studying I go back and watch the various episodes of my favorite shows. Here lately I have been trying to watch at least the last show of the previous season as many TV shows are starting their new season in the next week or two. At least by watching these episodes I will be prepared for what may come up this coming season. As a user you can also rate the shows and provide feedback for future viewers. This I have found very useful as I make decisions about what to view on the site, and I think would be useful in a digital library setting as well. If patrons of a digital library could provide feedback as to what they thought about the content it could be very useful to future users and the library staff as well. The type of comments a resource illicited could be another thing that allows librarians to determine what resources to buy or invest in, and what ones to do away with. Since a library is supposed to be user centered, the feedback from patrons could be key in helping to meet their information needs.

Ever since I signed up for the beta version of this site I have found it to be a fascinating collection. It allows users to have their own portable video collection that they can access from anywhere there is a Internet connection. I feel it is an excellent example of where an entity has gone out and created a service to meet user needs as people are not always able to tune in to a program when it is on or want to invest in a DVR. In order to better serve the public this site allows people to have access to their favorite programs when they can best enjoy them. This step by the television industry is very similar to the reason libraries have turned to allowing remote access to certain library resources. I am curious to see how this site changes over the next year or so as it becomes more popular.

* One neat thing the site is doing this week is allowing people to watch the first episodes of some shows a week before they are broadcast on TV. Kind of an interesting marketing ploy if you ask me…… 🙂

Written by robbinsville

September 24, 2008 at 5:30 pm

Scientists practicing an “open notebook” approach

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I seem to find themes for blog posts every week and it seems this week’s theme is a movement towards open access. Another interesting article I found was in Nature magazine concerned two scientists who are publishing their experimental research on line as they complete an experiment. This action their part is detrimental to receiving a patent for their work and they run the risk of their ideas being stolen by someone else. They are practicing “open notebook” science and feel that what is gained by making their findings public outweighs all, as the information they believe can help to improve scientific communication and further world knowledge. Now they understand that there are limits to what should be put on line, like scientists who are doing animal work. Of course while this is picking up popularity in scientific circles, according to the scientists those who see dollar signs are having real issues with it.

One thing that I thought was interesting about the article was the scientists expressed the feeling that the computer programs are not available that allow them to easily be able to place their findings on line. One of the scientists is actually using a wiki to publish his results. I am curious as to what they want in a computer program to practice this “open notebook” approach. Whoever is placed in charge of keeping up with all this data is really going to have a job on their hands. I hope that the science community comes up with a uniform standard of meta data, or all of this data could become an unsearchable mess. That is the concern that popped in my head as a future librarian and I am intrigued by the possibilities of what the scientists are doing.

Sanderson, Kathrine. “Data on Display.” Nature (September 15, 2008), http://www.nature.com.ezproxy1.lib.ou.edu/news/2008/080915/full/455273a.html .

Written by robbinsville

September 22, 2008 at 2:47 am

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Copyright Issues

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While surfing the Net today and thinking about my digital collections course, I came across the following the website – http://www.mygazines.com/ . I really thought it was a nice site because it allows me to be able to access interesting magazines articles without having a subscription. The website touts itself as a site where people can upload and share their favorite magazine articles. What the site does not get into though is copyright. To me this site is just like other sites that allow people to share things like music, it is done without consideration for copyright. It is a disturbing trend because without the creators of these great works must get paid in order to be able to make a living and provide for themselves. I could see this having the same effect on the publishing industry as it had on the music industry, and that is trying to reinvent their product while at the same time going after those who break their copyright agreements with readers. I am not entirely sure how successful they will be though, as the music industry has not had much success.

Sites such as this one are just one more thing out there could have a detrimental effect to those publishers trying to put out quality publications, because if all one must do is get on the Net and get access to content without paying. In the long run this could really make librarians’ jobs more difficult as the number of magazines decrease and individuals turn to the Net for information and may lack the skills or information to determine if they are reputable. I am going to be curious to see what action the publishing industry takes, and what form magazines and other publications take as information becomes more open or transparent. I guess as digital libraries and publishers place things on the Net will have to digitally protect their content, and maybe not allow users to print or download without paying and maybe not even then. As soon as the publisher/library allows the user to take possession of the work the proprietary control is lost and the big question is how to keep that control and be able to benefit from creating a quality product.

Written by robbinsville

September 22, 2008 at 1:57 am

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Interesting Picture – Library Book Parking Deck

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Just came across this picture and thought I would post it here.  Hope you enjoy 🙂

Library Book Parking Deck

Written by robbinsville

September 16, 2008 at 12:11 pm

Posted in Library

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What is Google Doing?

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I know that it seems from my blog that I have a Google obsession but it is not really the case.  What has happened is that Google has done a great deal as of late to raise some concerns in my mind.  This leads me to the story I found this morning,  Google search finds seafaring solution. According to the article Google is thinking of taking its entire data storehouse operation offshore and floating it on boats. This they say is to save money as they could use the ocean to cool and generate electricity to operate them. At the same time though, they are going to put the boats 7 miles offshore, which means they are in international waters and free from regulation by countries who are upset with the direction Google seems to be taking when it comes to data collection.

What concerns me about this is that without government regulation Google could do what they want with the information they are collecting. This makes me a bit uneasy as it could mean that they could sell personal surfing information to the highest bidder. While Google has always claimed that they are not out to do that but in today’s business climate it seems that ethics go out the window when money is to be made. If the stated reason Google is attepting to do this, then I applaud them in trying to find ways to be more efficient.  Until their words become concrete actions,  I am going to continue to view their actions with a wary eye.

Written by robbinsville

September 15, 2008 at 2:51 pm

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Google Chrome and the Digital Library

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The browser war has a new competitor in the form of Google’s new browser, Chrome. This browser is very similar in appearance to the others on the market but with the power of Google behind it, it could change the way people surf the web for years to come. The way it is going to do this though comes with a great deal of controversy, as it entails a big brother is watching approach. In the licensing agreement for the browser the user agrees to allow Google to capture and send back their entire internet browsing behavior. This information is something that Google believes will allow it to better help people search the net. Aside from agreeing to this stipulation, the user also agrees to allow Google to download updates and bug fixes as it sees fit. The use in essence is giving up a great deal of autonomy to Google to just use the browser.

When the browser was first launched I downloaded it to see what made it so special in comparison to the others. It does have a nice clean look and I do like the fact that it is a bit faster than the competitors but not enough for me to make this my default browser. Another facet of this browser that makes it interesting is that it is an open source program that allows programmers to tweak and add features. What bothers me though is that Google assumes the right to record all of what I do on the internet, which I think is stretching that bounds of what a company or web browser should be able to do. Being on the internet is already not a private matter as sites are constantly recording IP address and what not, but for Google to be able to store all this information in one place is a bit uneasy. While Google claims this is being done in order to improve searches on the internet, the company is not just producing this browser out of the goodness of its’ heart. There has to be a way for the company to make money from the venture, which can only be done through advertising and focusing those messages at users based on their internet behavior. I am not sure I trust a for profit company to protect my information from being accessed by others, as money always to seems to top ethical behavior in today’s business world.

One thing about the browser that I think is interesting is that what Google is attempting to do with the information gathered from the use of their browser and that is attempting to make browsing more efficient. If Google is successful in getting a large number of people to use the browser, it would give them more information about people’s searching behavior than any organization has ever had. This could enable them to come up with metadata that will allow individuals to properly classify items on the net, so that they can be easily found. Today it seems this is something that information professionals are struggling to do, at least when it comes to a standard that everyone understands and is willing to follow. I am intrigued to see where the efforts of Google and other web based companies will lead in the coming years. Whatever they do is surely to find its way into the interfaces that will be created for digital libraries, which will make them more accessible to the masses.

Since I wrote the initial part of this entry the other day, Google has backed away from some parts of its user agreement. This has curbed some concerns but not all. An even more interesting development is that Google is proposing a partnership with Yahoo. This could really speed up the efforts of many to come up with a better way for searching information on the net, and other information groups. The question I have though is at what cost to our privacy is all of these advancements going to come with, and are people willing to allow this behavior in order to have their information needs met more efficiently?

Further Reading/ Sources

How will Google Crome change the user experience on the Web?

Google Chrome’s Fine Print Spurs Privacy Concerns

Chrome Eliminates Google’s Middleman Problems

Google amends Chrome license following privacy objections

A few Google Chrome secrets

Google Chrome gathering information on you

US ad body opposes Google-Yahoo deal

Written by robbinsville

September 8, 2008 at 5:45 pm